Hopi Tribe, Heyheya-Amutaqy Kachina $48,000>

The kachina dolls made by the Hopi, the native inhabitants of what is now Northeastern Arizona, represent benevolent spirits that reside on sacred mesas and mountains. Often carved from dried cottonwood roots, such figures would have been given to children as part of their religious training and are revered as intermediaries between supernatural and worldly realms.


DESIGNER/

Hopi Tribe

DATE/

1890

MATERIALS/

Carved from cottonwood, wearing a cotton, white painted kilt and white cloth shirt, articulated arms, standing with slight parted legs, wearing brown knitted leggings with red cloth stripe at top border, brown, white and red waist sash in horizontal stripe, cylindrical band with vertical lines of black pigment on full white cloth around neck, a case mask painted white with protruding mouth, eyes and nose, painted red and black in horizontal pattern, similar geometric painted design on both cheeks, straw attached to the crown of the mask, maize motif with yellow and black pigments on sides of mask.

DIMENSIONS/

10.16 x 7.62 x 36.83 cm

STYLE/

Historic

HERITAGE/

United States

SHIPS FROM/

Santa Fe

$48,000

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